Saturday, June 27, 2015

How to Grow Your Own Crystal Jewelry Tutorial

By on Saturday, June 27, 2015 7 Comments

Talk about coincidences.  I was just looking at possible glass globe supplies when my friend Aims called my attention to this fun video tutorial by Mark Montano.  She knew I would love it as I do have a background in science.  But really, anyone can learn to grow your own crystal jewelry!  This is a staple of grade school science projects.

 The basic ingredient for his tutorial is just borax (sodium borate) which is used in various household cleaners and detergents. It also has a ton of other uses. It has low toxicity (and is actually a naturally occuring substance) so it is safe to use. Borax can be bought in the laundry detergent section of stores or even Amazon - one brand is 20 Mule Team Borax.

Some points about the video.  Mark uses boiling water as it helps dissolve the borax more quickly.  It doesn't have to be boiling - just hot.  Also note that you should add enough borax to the solution until it cannot dissolve any more - some powdery stuff will remain.  This is what is known as a saturated solution.

He also used pipe cleaner to so the crystals have somewhere to grow on.  You could try different shapes like a borax crystal heart or a borax snowflake. It doesn't have to be a pipe cleaner either. Check out his golden geode video tutorial where he grow those crystals on pebbles.

Other common household items can also be used for crystal making.  Check out this quick crystal project using Epsom salts (magnesium sulfate)  . Or use alum powder used for pickling (spices section of grocery store).  Check out some tips on alum crystal growing here.

Crystal growing is more of an art so you will have to experiment including keeping stable temperatures etc.

Before You Go:
Original Post by THE BEADING GEM
Jewelry Making Tips - Jewelry Business Tips 



  1. Love this idea both for myself, as well as my Grand children..Thanks so much. The scientist in me is happy.♥

    1. Chuckle! You and me both! Have fun with the project.

  2. Such Fun!!

    I can see doing something with this and then wrapping it somehow to protect the experiment is on its way!!

  3. I was indeed looking for a similar tutorial sometime back and couldnt find where I bookmarked it. Thanks for these links. now off to find the local commercial name for borax powder and buy it

    1. Have fun making crystals! As I said, it is more of an art than a science.

  4. I still remember my crystals didn't grow for the school experiment, so I will try again :) This is a nice alternative to the dry flowers in glass spheres, which are no doubt very beautiful but I'd rather try something different :)

    1. Do try again! I am sure you will have better luck. Believe me, drying flowers for jewelry making is not that easy!