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Wire Wrapped Sword Pendant Tutorial

Lots of people love the medieval period. Reenactments and medieval festivals are very popular.  I, for one, enjoy reading about that historical era (and others. See my bejeweled biographies here). If you are like me or know another with similar interests, consider making this awesome wire wrapped sword pendant.  This tutorial is by wire jewelry designer, Rhonda Chase.

Rhonda said she designed it for her son.

It is not a difficult project. She does a great job of building up the design. Well worth seeing how she makes the point. Rest assured, one does not make it sharp!

I love how she added a second point to simulate the look of the blade of a double edged knightly sword. Her wiring of the gemstones is excellent too.

Her small scale work does indeed resemble a real sword. Here is a picture of an Albion Sword , a replica of the 13th-century "Sword of Saint Maurice" of Turin. Such swords were highly effective weapons especially in the hands of knights who trained from boyhood. Wealthy noblemen and rulers were the only ones who could afford ornamental ones for show.


Before You Go:

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Original Post by THE BEADING GEM
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7 comments:

  1. This looks great. I'm always looking for things that guys might like. Already have a few customers in mind. Thanks, Pearl!

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    1. Great! It is hard to find just the right jewelry for guys, sometimes!

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  2. I'm not normally interested in period jewelry or swords but I love this sword pendant and could actually see myself making one. Thanks Pearl.

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  3. Once again you pique my interest. My son gave me an inlaid display knife for my birthday - I love it because it is a knife, but also because of my love of Native American art. Also as you know, the samurai used to decorate their swords with kumihimo - my big love. I saw several examples when we visited Japan. But then you go on to refer us to your "bejeweled biographies". I have visited Washington DC several times and one of my stops is always the Jewel Room at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History. What a treat to see the jewels that you talk about in the biographies in the flesh. Stunning!!

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    1. Thanks to you, I learned a lot about how kumihimo plays a part in samurai gear! Lucky you to have seen the marvelous jewels at the Smithsonian.

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You're AWESOME! Thanks for the comment and feedback. You do make a difference on my blog!

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